10 Cool Facts About Paris

1. The flame of the Statue of Liberty

The flame of the Statue of Liberty is located near the northern end of the Pont de l’Alma, onthe Place de l’Alma, in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. Flame de la Liberté is a full-sized, gold-leaf covered replica of the new flame at the upper endof the torch carried in the hand of the Statue of Liberty. The flowers on the monument are placed in honor to Lady Diana, and come tourists think that the monument is built in her honor, but it is not. The monument represented the culmination of the newspaper’s 1987 celebration of its hundredth anniversary of publishing a daily newspaper in English language, in Paris. Actually, the Flame of Liberty is a lasting symbol of the friendship uniting two countries, US and France.

2. Montmartre: the Martyrs’ Mound

Montmartre is a large hill in Paris’s 18th arrondissement, its 130 m high. Montmartre is primarily known for its artistic history, many artists had studios or worked in or around Montmartre. Like Pablo Picasso and Vincent van Gogh. But, it’s also the setting for several hit films in France. The toponym Mons Martis, Latin for Mount of Mars. In Roman times, Montmartre had two hilltop temples devoted to Mars and Mercury. It was known as Martyrs’ Mound from the Ancient Times after Saint Denis. According to the legend, after Saint Denis was beheaded here in the 2nd century AD by the Romans, he picked up his head and walked to the place now known as Saint-Denis Basilica.

MONTMARTRE: THE MARTYRS’ MOUND

3. The Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower gives you some of the best panoramic views. The tower has three levels for visitors, with restaurants on the first and second levels. The top level’s upper platform is 276m above the ground, also it is the highest observation deck accessible to the public in the European Union. The Eiffel Tower is the tallest structure in Paris. It is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ De Mars. It’s named after the engineer Gustave Eiffer. It weights about 7,000t and uses 50t paint every seven years.

THE EIFFEL TOWER

4. Les Invalides – The golden dome of the Invalides

The complex of buildings known as Les Invalides sits in Paris’s 7th arrondissement and consists of museums and monuments relates to the military history of France. The most recognizable and well-known part of Les Invalides is the Dome des Invalides, a gold-domed building now used as a burial site for a number of the country’d war heroes. The dome itself is107 meters high, making it one of the tallest monuments in Paris. To celebrate the bicentenary of the French Revolution in 1989, the Dome of Les Invalides was re-gilded, using 12,65 kg of gold leaf.

LES INVALIDES – THE GOLDEN DOME OF THE INVALIDES

5. The great watch of obelisk of the place de la concorade

Raised in Paris in October 1833., the Egyptian obelisk was one of two set up at the Luxor Temple by Ramses II. The ancient Egyptian obelisk that stands on the Place de la Concorde in central Paris, arrived in France on 10 may 1833. The point of the Luxor obelisk standing on the Place de la Concorde indicated international time, making it the largest sundial in the world. It is also Paris’ oldest monument.

THE GREAT WATCH OF OBELISK OF THE PLACE DE LA CONCORADE

6. The old bridge of Pont Neuf

The Pont Neuf despite its name (New Bridge) is the oldest standing bridge across the river Seine in Paris. It was the first road in Paris to benefit from pavements separating pedestrians and traffic. It was also the first bridge to be built without houses on it, and the name was given to distinguist it from older bridges that wre lined on both sides with houses.

THE OLD BRIDGE OF PONT NEUF

7. Tour Saint Jacques: a bell tower without a church

The Saint-Jacques Tower is a monument located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. This 52-meter Framboyant Gothic tower is all that remains of the former 16th century Church of Saint-Jacques- de-la- Boucherie. Which was demolished in 1797, during the French Revolution. What remains of the destroyed church is now considered a national historic landmark. When the church was dismantled in 1802, it was decided to keep the belfry which has since been converted to a weather station.

TOUR SAINT JACQUES

8. The Clock Tower of the Conciergerie

The Clock Tower was built between 1350 and 1353. It is situated at the junction of Quai de l’Horloge and Boulevard du Palais in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. It is with 47m the Conciergerie’s tallest tower. The Conciergerie clock if France’s first public clock.

THE CLOCK TOWER OF THE CONCIERGERIE

9. Square du Vert-Galant and the reputation of a king

At the western tip of the Île de la Cité, at the Pont Neuf end, is a little green space called Square du Vert-Galant. The square was named after Henry IV whose nickname was “Vert-Galant” (“Green Gallant”). The old king had a reputation of acquiring many mistresses in spite of his advanced age, hence his nickname.

SQUARE DU VERT-GALANT AND THE REPUTATION OF A KING

10. Half-timbered houses in Paris: a rarity

There are only a few houses from the middle-ages to be found in Paris. Two of them are in Rue François Miron in the Marais, in the 4th arrondissement. They date back to the 15th century and have been much restored in the 1970s.

HALF-TIMBERED HOUSES IN PARIS: A RARITY

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